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already hit hard by hurricane sandy. the storm, and the election, nightly news begins now. >>> good evening, while the nation tries to recover from a deep recession, and in a presidential race, we were after all, all told, was as close and as tight as they get. barack obama, the 44th president of the united states was reelected last night. he was somehow able to stitch together a convincing victory, winning just about all of the battleground states that were so heavily fought over in the most expensive race in u.s. history. it was early this morning when the president appeared with his family becoming the third consecutive two-term president we've elected. that has not happened since the time of presidents jefferson, madison, and monroe. president obama won a decisive victory in both the electoral college and in the popular vote. the outlyer, the one state on the map not yet called is florida. and here we are on the east coast, also covering this. a nor'easter, a storm so fierce the governor of new jersey said it will move his state's recovery effort backward for a time. and here is
hurricane sandy. we'll look at its possible effect on turnout tomorrow. and would you believe the threat from the next storm on the way, a nor'easter threatening for mid-week. the storm, and the election, our coverage, nbc nightly news begins now. >>> good evening, and we can tell you it is almost over now, after a couple of years and a couple of billion, on the eve of decision 2012, we are very close to knowing the first indications of how this race is going to break. heading into election day, by all accounts this election is a statistical dead heat, the latest national head to head has this as a 48-47 race, while state polls vary and while the battleground states call for a lot, you can tell how tight the race is by watching the two campaigns, positively barnstorming the battleground states, battling it out, based on the hope of converts here. all this, while the whole region of the country sits in the dark and watches the profound plaza h peter alexander traveling with the romney campaign in columbus, ohio. peter, good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you. late today, the
as the suffering from hurricane sandy continues for so many people. ron allen's been covering that, he's across the river from new york city in hard hit hoboken, new jersey. ron, good evening. >> reporter: good evening to you, brian. this city hall has been the center for relief operations here. today they added voting to the long list of things they're trying to accomplish. for voters in new york and new jersey, still battling the aftermath of the storm, there was frustration and confusion, and a huge problem caused by e-mail voting. election day got off to a chaotic start in communities outside new york city that still don't have power. when voters arrived at polling places that were not ready. >> it's a disgrace. i've been here three times, they finally got machines in, now the machines are jammed up. >> reporter: in manhattan, where the storms effects still linger, the lines were long. in queens, tents were set up outside unusable polling places. shuttle buses carried other voters to alternative sites. throughout the metro area, some who turned out early even used flashlights. any means pos
. >> reporter: the family is staying at their daughter's house, the only one who had power restored after sandy hit. but it didn't last long. >> all of a sudden, it just went black. >> reporter: now, almost nobody in this town has electricity. >> people can't be 18, 19, 20 days without electricity in this day and age. >> reporter: restoring power throughout the region has now become more difficult. >> some experienced power outages as a result of snow and wind yesterday, which set us back slightly. >> reporter: and the hard-hit area goes as far as point pleasant, new jersey. >> any time you have snow on top, doesn't make it much easier. >> reporter: crews around the country were already working around the clock. this team came from washington state. >> it is overwhelming, people don't realize, they see their small area, they wonder why it takes so long to get their power back on, but the amount of devastation is just so widespread that it is crazy. >> reporter: just down the road in bay head, the duncan's home is in -- unlivable. like many, they wonder when the crazy weather will finally end. >
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)